Mon. Jan 25th, 2021

Blackaphillyated

Where Entertainment meets Reality

#CertifiedIcons: Rowdy Rebel

By Nicholas Allen

Instagram: @thenichway

Rowdy Rebel, 2014

Brooklyn drill music is having a major takeover and it’s credited widely to Pop Smoke and other rappers like Fivio Foreign, 22GZ, Sheff G, Sleepy Hallow and more. 

The origin of drill music is from Chicago, and the king of drill is Chief Keef. With that being said, Brooklyn drill is a mixture of Chicago and UK drill and trap music. Brooklyn drill has its specific origins too, sparking its way into popularity in 2014 with Bobby Schmurda’s “Hot N*gga” and other songs from members of the GS9 rap collective. Notable Rowdy Rebel songs are “Computers” and “Schmoney Dance” both featuring Bobby Schmurda.

Shortly after Rowdy Rebel and Bobby Schmurda’s mainstream success, the two were indicted in 2014 and incarcerated in 2016 after both pled guilty to conspiracy in the fourth degree and criminal possession of a weapon in the second degree.

Since then, the Brooklyn drill music scene has never been the same. On December 15th, 2020, Rowdy Rebel was released on parole until 2025. Bobby Schmurda is set to be released in December of this year, 2021. The question now stands, what makes Rowdy a certified icon?

At Blackaphillyated, a certified icon is not measured by success. Certified icons are genuine people with big hearts, people who make use of their platform to do good for their community and raise positive morale. 

Since his release on December 15th, Rowdy Rebel has given back so much to his community. Just 9 days after his release he gave away $200,000 worth of groceries to his community on Christmas eve. 

Rowdy Rebel has also recently handed out $50,000. In the video, Rowdy Rebel also mentions that the media likes to run negative stories, and prefer a scandal to charity as an example. This is why he decided to give back to his community, to remind people there is still humility and positivity in the world. Rowdy Rebel is clearly a leader in his community, “I’m here with y’all. I made it out and y’all can do the same thing.”